WiRED International Applauds CDC’s One Health

BY ALLISON KOZICHAROW AND BERNICE BORN

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he birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees and the moon up above and a thing called" … One Health?

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) One Health program states that the health of people is connected to the health of animals and the health of the environment.

 

Why is One Health important? A One Health approach is important, because CDC contends that six out of every ten infectious diseases in humans are spread from animals. (See WiRED’s webpage for a comprehensive look at the most dangerous animal to humans: the mosquito.)

 

WiRED is ever mindful of the social and environmental determinants of good health, which are access to medical care, clean air, safe drinking water, sufficient food and secure shelter.

The goal of One Health is to encourage the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines — working locally, nationally and globally — to achieve the best health for people, animals and the environment.

 

CDC uses a One Health approach by working with physicians, veterinarians, ecologists and many others to monitor and control public health threats and to learn how diseases spread among people, animals and the environment.

 

WiRED recognizes the symbiosis between all living things on Planet Earth. In fact, WiRED frames the training modules in its Health Learning Center within this delicate balance. WiRED is ever mindful of the social and environmental determinants of good health, which are access to medical care, clean air, safe drinking water, sufficient food and secure shelter.

 

During the next two years, WiRED will enhance its collection of training models to include a broader range of topics specifically on the One Health theme. Scientific research is demonstrating beyond question that what happens to the planet’s animal population and to its environment has an increasing impact on human health. WiRED recognizes the need to reflect that critical view in its educational work on global human health.

 

 


CDC One Health Observations

 

Factor (Cause)Change (Effect)
Human populations are growing and expanding into new geographic areas.As a result, more people live in close contact with wild and domestic animals. Close contact provides more opportunities for diseases to pass between animals and people.
The earth has experienced changes in climate and land use, such as deforestation and intensive farming practices.Disruptions in environmental conditions and habitats provide new opportunities for diseases to pass to animals.
International travel and trade have increased.As a result, diseases can spread quickly across the globe.

 

 

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