WiRED Marks World Hepatitis Day

BY OLIVIA SPIRITO; EDITED BY BERNICE BORN

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ach year on July 28, we acknowledge World Hepatitis Day. One in 12 people worldwide lives with either chronic hepatitis B or C.

 

Wired International’s recently updated Hepatitis Module discusses five types of viral hepatitis — A, B, C, D and E, and their prevention, differences, causes, diagnosis and treatment. Hepatitis is caused by a variety of toxins (such as drugs or alcohol), autoimmune conditions, or pathogens (including viruses, bacteria or parasites).

 

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver that can cause loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dark-colored urine, stomach pain and jaundice. The liver is the largest internal organ in the body and is responsible for fighting infections, removing chemicals and toxins, digesting foods and storing energy. However, not everyone with hepatitis experiences symptoms, so many cases go undetected until it is too late.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that up to 80 percent of people with hepatitis C experience no symptoms, and yet hepatitis C is the most severe form of the disease. Hepatitis C has no vaccine and can lead to chronic hepatitis, which eventually can cause cirrhosis, or scarring of the liver, liver cancer and liver failure. Doctors recently have made marked advances in treatment for hepatitis C with new, “direct-acting” anti-viral medications. Treatments offered today, while more effective than those in the past are a months-long process; chances for a cure, while good, aren’t certain.

 

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) focus this year is on prevention, treatment and care services for people with hepatitis. Testing just for hepatitis B and C could save 325 million people around the world.

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) focus this year is on prevention, treatment and care services for people with hepatitis. Testing just for hepatitis B and C could save 325 million people around the world. By improving partnerships and funding in testing and treatment of hepatitis, lives can be saved faster and more efficiently.

 

Worldwide, 300 million people are unaware that they are living with viral hepatitis. With WIRED’s modules, information, and dedication people can learn about the symptoms, treatment options and methods of prevention.

 

 

 

 


Do you need to be vaccinated and/or tested for hepatitis?

 

Because it can take years for the disease to develop, CDC recommends hepatitis C testing for all adults born between 1945 and 1965, the group with the highest probability of having the virus. They should all receive one-time testing for the hepatitis C virus (HCV) regardless of their risk.

 

To see if you need to be tested and/or vaccinated for hepatitis, take the CDC’s online Hepatitis Risk Assessment.

 

 


You can download the module in this story, and all 400+ of our health modules, through WiRED’s Health Module Access Program (HealthMAP) by clicking here. This easy-to-use, free program will enable you to create your own customized library of health education training modules. You can learn more about HealthMAP through WiRED's animation.

 

 

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